Inspiring Patterns in Nature and Art



Alpine Patterns, 30x24, acrylic painting by Tatjana Mirkov-Popovicki - available in the Buckland Southerst Gallery


Forces that cause changes on our planet sure make some amazing patterns!


I am always fascinated by the beauty of rock patterns, be it on an ocean beach, in a desert, or on the top of a mountain. Even if you look closely at the texture of weathered tree-trunks and wrinkles and creases of our bodies, you can see how elegantly each line is shaped. Erosion is beautiful!




Years ago I used to paint figurative works and marvel at the folds and curvatures of human body, but for many years now I find my main inspiration in nature.

The shapes found in the landscape are a language of change. I think I could spend a lifetime studying that language and creating visual stories.

I've always thought that the life writes best stories, so my creative process is usually triggered by seeing some interesting pattern. Then my imagination takes over, and I develop the image in a direction where muse takes me. Sometimes the result is close to what really is there, other times it ends up completely transformed.

Turns of seasons are especially great times to seek inspiration outside. My hubby and I took a lovely road trip to Okanagan last weekend to admire the autumn foliage. The trip was a great success and we came back with some wonderful reference material. The Manning Provincial Park section  of our journey was especially magical.



Back in the city, with days getting cooler and shorter, it's time to start planning for indoors activities.

Art studios and galleries are great places to visit. If you are in the area, make sure you drop by the Buckland Southerst Gallery in Dunderave Village in West Vancouver, to see what a great job Chris has done updating the space!





In Edmonton, Brent and Marie would love to see you stop by in the Lando Gallery, and in Calgary, I recommend visiting Webster Galleries.

I hope you will enjoy seeing a few of my paintings  on display.


Happy Autumn!


Tatjana

Work In Progress

Seven Veils Falls, Lake O'Hara (Work In Progress), 30x24, acrylic painting by Tatjana Mirkov-Popovicki


Is it done yet? When will it be finished? It looks perfect to me!

Any of this sounds familiar? There is also my personal favorite (not) - I hope you don't ruin it!

Okay, I admit, that last one comes from my internal self doubt (the longer I work on a piece, the higher it raises its nasty head).

Regardless of all this trepidation, I believe that each painting takes its sweet time, and some happen to take longer than others.

All paintings are not made the same. There are those that fly off the brush, and others that have a level of complexity that slowly unfolds until all its elements fit together the way the artist finds satisfying.

The angst over trying to speed up the process can really affect my flow. I have been told (many times) that patience is not one of my virtues, so I constantly have to deal with lack of it.

What to do when a paintings demands more and more time and I feel I am approaching my wits end?

Yep, I know, I can read your mind. I should walk away for a while, yes? Great advice!

Here are some questions I ask myself while a complex work in progress painting is resting on the secondary easel:

- Is the composition really sound? Should something in it be simplified or tweaked?

- Are the values appropriate to the scene? (ratio of dark and light areas)

- Are the edges treated well? (soft, hard, disappearing, etc.)

- Are the colors harmonious yet surprising?

- Is the surface quality sound? (texture, brushstrokes)

- Does it look fresh? What can be done to make it all look easy? (now this is an interesting subject on its own, isn't it?)


And then one day I look at it and all parts of the painting appear to sing, my eyes find a specific dance in it, and I feel that familiar pang of joy in my throat. Sounds melodramatic? Well it is. I am sure that every art lover has felt it. The painting comes alive in some way and it's ready to go out into the world. I think that deserves a drum-roll! What would art be without drama?

Happy Autumn!

Tatjana