Diptych


Work in progress (still untitled) diptych by Tatjana Mirkov-Popovicki, acrylic, 20x48


This is the first time I've planned to make a painting that consists of multiple panels. I have made a triptych some time ago, but in that case, the two side-panels were added years after the central image was done.

I am motivated by an idea from the literary world - the idea of creating a visual version of linked stories. For those interested in this concept, linked stories are stand-alone pieces of literature with something in common which gives a collection of them a greater meaning. They can be linked by common characters, by a common setting, or by a common theme. I love this concept because it gives the artist freedom to play with multiple pieces, to re-arrange them, separate them, or join them together.

In the world of visual art, we create meaningful bodies of work and present them in themed art exhibits. We also aspire to have our art in curated collections. On the smallest scale, the "mix and match" idea can be applied to the use of a multi-paneled format. So, this time, I wanted to challenge myself to create a composition that would work both as a diptych and as two separate pieces.

The main feature of the left panel is an island reflected in a glacial lake. The right panel's composition is established by the glacier and an interesting formation of rocks. Put together, the outline of the mountain and the rich chroma of the lake dominate the overall composition. At least I hope so! The piece is still a work in progress.

I am sharing a few steps of the creative process. The final image is reserved for the opening of my solo show in July in the beautiful Studio Connexion Gallery in Nakusp, BC.








 I hope that this concept interests you and that you will consider it for your own artsy endeavors.

Happy spring!

Tatjana

Step By Step - Brambles Study


Brambles Study, 11x14, original painting by Tatjana Mirkov-Popovicki


Here is a very quick (1h) acrylic sketch with step by step snapshots that capture the painting process. This was painted from a photo displayed on my computer screen, without any preliminary drawings, thumbnails etc. This is a quick and joyful way of painting, perfect for trying out patterns and compositions in preparation for a larger piece. Aside from having great fun, another good thing about this approach is that you end up with these fresh small pieces which are little darlings all by their own.



Step 1 - Transparent red oxide imprimatura and a gestural block-in of dark shapes with diox purple. I use a large flat brush for this step.




Step 2 - Adding gestural block-in with a mid-value green mixture.



Step 3 - Repeat the same approach with mid-value mixtures of  earthy yellow and red



Step 4 - Block in the blues in the background to suggest the sea, sky, and distant coastline




Step 5 - Switch to a medium-sized flat brush and reinstate the dark areas, add details - branches, foreground texture etc.


Step 6 - Add sunlit areas - lights in the bark, grasses, leaves, using light mixtures of gray, green, orange, yellow. Keep reinstating darks and adding details.



Step 7 (the Final image on the top) - Switch to a medium/small (e.g. #6) flat brush, punch up all lights, punch up the chroma by adding a few new colors (reds, pinks, greens), and add as many details as you feel needed. It's fun to have some crisp highlights while leaving other areas unresolved.

This was quick. I am ready for the next one!

Happy painting,
Tatjana