Step By Step - Brambles Study


Brambles Study, 11x14, original painting by Tatjana Mirkov-Popovicki


Here is a very quick (1h) acrylic sketch with step by step snapshots that capture the painting process. This was painted from a photo displayed on my computer screen, without any preliminary drawings, thumbnails etc. This is a quick and joyful way of painting, perfect for trying out patterns and compositions in preparation for a larger piece. Aside from having great fun, another good thing about this approach is that you end up with these fresh small pieces which are little darlings all by their own.



Step 1 - Transparent red oxide imprimatura and a gestural block-in of dark shapes with diox purple. I use a large flat brush for this step.




Step 2 - Adding gestural block-in with a mid-value green mixture.



Step 3 - Repeat the same approach with mid-value mixtures of  earthy yellow and red



Step 4 - Block in the blues in the background to suggest the sea, sky, and distant coastline




Step 5 - Switch to a medium-sized flat brush and reinstate the dark areas, add details - branches, foreground texture etc.


Step 6 - Add sunlit areas - lights in the bark, grasses, leaves, using light mixtures of gray, green, orange, yellow. Keep reinstating darks and adding details.



Step 7 (the Final image on the top) - Switch to a medium/small (e.g. #6) flat brush, punch up all lights, punch up the chroma by adding a few new colors (reds, pinks, greens), and add as many details as you feel needed. It's fun to have some crisp highlights while leaving other areas unresolved.

This was quick. I am ready for the next one!

Happy painting,
Tatjana

4 comments:

  1. This painting is equally delightful at stage 5!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great point, Cindy! It's all about the artist's aesthetics and the mood of the day. :-)

      Delete
  2. Yeah, it is so cool. I am inspired to learn your lesson. Thank you. Can you advice how to draw big size of picture using small painting. You wrote, that will be draw on big canvas and now this picture is preparing stage

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good question, Ksenija :-) Thanks very much for your interest! I don't typically transfer and draw from small to a big canvas. I paint directly on a bigger canvas, repeating the same steps with a bigger brush. That way the strokes will again be fresh, and the larger painting will be slightly different from the smaller one. Makes sense?

      Delete